RESERVATIONS

Oregon wine country

Taste McMinnville Month

February is Taste McMinnville Month and a great time to break up the winter dulldrums wherever you might live. Why not make it a new and unique experience in the Willamette Valley and more specifically, McMinnville. Why in February? It is Valentine’s Day celebrations all month. There are wine and chocolate pairing s across the valley all month. The landscape in the valley is lush and green. There is less tourism traffic to get around in. There are great opportunities to save money on travel and lodging that time of year. And February, like every month, is a great time to be enjoying Pinot Noir in the valley.

This year is even a bigger opportunity to do so in McMinnville. This February McMinnville will be celebrating Taste McMinnville Month featuring craft beverage producers of wine, beer, and spirits; along with all the fabulous restaurants that reside in the city. It will be a great time to experience all that McMinnville and the surrounding community have to offer in culinary bounty. McMinnville is the heart of the valley, has a great, thriving downtown shopping scene, and plenty of art and cultural activities to enjoy including music events at many venues and the Gallery Theater.

McMinnville reminds me of Calistoga thirty years ago. Back then, it was an outpost for most of the Napa wine tourism because it was so far away from San Fransisco. Today it is the epicenter of the valley. While McMinnville is farther southwest of Portland (35 miles), it is far from the maddening crowd, in the heart of the Willamette Valley, and half way between Portland and the coast.

McMinnville also reminds me of Beaune in Burgundy, France. As in Beaune, McMinnville lives and breaths the wine country, and the vineyards and wineries surrounding it. It has embraced the industry as part of it’s culture and reflects that in the multitude of dining experiences.

Come check it out this February!  Click here for more details.

Chardonnay in the Willamette Valley

Have you had Willamette Valley Chardonnay?  Yes, everyone knows Pinot Noir is No. 1 in the Willamette Valley, and it should be. Many might suggest it is Pinot Gris because it is the second largest varietal planted in the Willamette Valley and exceeded the acreage of Chardonnay a few years ago.

But let’s take a look at history. In the late 1800s and up until prohibition, Chardonnay was king of the hill. There was a thriving wine industry back then dominated by Chardonnay. After prohibition and the destruction of the wine industry, these vineyards stayed abandoned until the 1950s. While some vines remained, most were ripped out and/or replaced with Pinot Gris and Pinot Blanc.

Then came 1965 when a couple of pioneers planted Pinot Noir in the valley and the rest is history, at least from a red grape viewpoint. On the white grape side, these pioneers resurrected some Chardonnay vines, but most were replanted to Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, or Pinot Blanc; with a few areas planted to Chardonnay vines brought up from California. As time passed, more acres continued to be planted to Pinot Gris until the total acreage surpassed Chardonnay (as there was not much expansion of Chardonnay planting).

Why? Most of the early plantings of Chardonnay were done with what were considered to be “warm weather clones” from California. This mattered because the cool weather in the Willamette Valley did not afford the heat needed to fully ripen these Chardonnay grapes. As a result, the Chardonnay wines produced in the Willamette Valley were not up to the quality that the growers wanted nor appealed to the market. So, growers continued to focus on growing more Pinot Noir.

What did not make sense to many of us was that Pinot Noir and Chardonnay go together like peanut butter and jelly. Just as Pinot Noir is king in Burgundy, Chardonnay is queen. Why not in the Willamette Valley? With better farming practices, warmer weather in recent years, and a shift to cooler weather clones; the valley has experienced a resurgence of Chardonnay. It has also helped that some California winemakers with great Chardonnay experience have come to the valley. As a result, wine growers in the Willamette Valley are producing some fabulous Chardonnays. That is reflected in the wines that are featured at the Oregon Chardonnay Celebration on February 24, 2018. We are so happy to be selected as a featured winery at this wonderful event.

I predict that 10-20 years from now, the wine world will acknowledge Willamette Valley Chardonnay as it does Pinot Noir today.  Come taste our wonderful Chardonnay soon!

Holiday Wine Pairings

Looking for a great idea for pairing wine for the holidays?  Try Michelle’s recipe that works perfectly with both our Holiday Wine Packages. This will be served along with other wonderful items every Saturday & Sunday in our tasting room for the month of November.

Sweet Potato & Ham Crostini
Prep Time: 10 min. Cook Time: 40 min. Total Time: 50 min.

  • 1 Large Sweet Potato
  • 3 tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 1 tsp. Sea Salt
  • 5 oz. Goat Cheese
  • 3 tbsp. Youngberg Hill Organic Honey
  • 2 slices Honey Glazed Ham cut into small pieces
  • 1/2 cup Candied Walnut pieces
  • 3-4 Sprigs of Thyme

To Roast the Sweet Potato: Heat oven to 400 degrees. Wash sweet potato and dry with a towel. Slice sweet potato into 1/8 – 1/4 inch slices. Mix together Olive Oil and Sea Salt and lightly coat sweet potato slices. Place on baking tray making sure that they do not touch each other. Cook in the oven for 20-25 minutes.  Flip the slices, and cook for another 15-20 minutes until they are cooked through and crispy on edges.  Note: cooking time may vary based on size and thickness of slices. Let slices cool a bit before topping

Toppings:

  • Place a small dollop of Goat Cheese
  • Drizzle on Honey
  • Add pieces of Ham.  Note: You can add the ham cold, heated or fried.  My 1st choice is fried.
  • Top with Candied Walnut pieces and a sprinkle fresh Thyme leaves

Youngberg Hill’s Charitable Giving

We have had the honor over the years of helping families annually with our many charities including Boys & Girls Club, CAP, YCAP, See Ya Later Foundation, Henderson House, Give A Little Foundation, and The Ronald McDonald House Foundation.  We focus on specific charities to make a larger impact in each rather than doing many charities with less impact. This year we have decided to increase our giving to Give A Little. Strengthening communities by providing hope, happiness, and comfort to families and children who need it most is important to us. We are committed to giving back to our community as an important part of who we are. We have chosen to focus more on Give A Little Foundation because of their effort to assist the local McMinnville High School students not only to be able to successfully achieve their goal of graduating, but also experience those little things that make high school a great memory of life.

What is the Give A Little Foundation?
They are an independent, grass-roots, nonprofit organization that provides immediate, one-time financial assistance to individuals and families in Yamhill County who are in crisis or experiencing severe adversity.  They provide a safety net for those who may have nowhere else to turn, always with the goal of helping people maintain or achieve self-sufficiency. To donate directly to this wonderful cause, click here.

To provide more support for this great program, we have committed to donate $15 for every bottle of 2014 Nicolette’s Barrel Select Pinot Noir. The Nicolette’s Select is our special reserve bottling of only 25 cases.  The Nicolette’s Select will be available in the tasting room and online. With your help, we can provide over $4000 to Give A Little Foundation.

 

Top 5 Festivals for Fall Wine Events

Harvest for the 2016 vintage is just around the corner and that means it’s almost time to celebrate. There are numerous festivals around Oregon that incorporate local sustainable farms, specialty chefs, and famous wineries. Come experience what Oregon Wine country is all about with these Top 5 Festivals for Harvest Wine Events.

Carlton Crush Harvest Festival – September 10, 2016

The Carlton Crush Harvest festival is a full day of activities for both kids and adults. It features complimentary morning yoga, live music and entertainment, Kids’ Watermelon Eating contest and Grape Stomp, and local art. Enjoy terrific food from a variety of restaurants such as The Horse Radish, and Ribslayer BBQ. Match the mouthwatering food with your choice of wine from more than 10 local wineries around the area. Entrance and Parking Free.  carltoncrush.com

 

Feast Portland – September 15-18, 2016blog 8 2016

Known as the “The best food festival in the country.” by Thrillist National, the “food festival to beat” by Tasting Table Feast Portland is entering it’s 5th year of inspiring the creative revolution of food and wine. Feast Portland offers a full weekend of hands on cooking and cocktail classes, wine tastings, brunch, BBQ cookouts, IPA tasting and once-in-a lifetime experiences. Since 2012 Feast Portland has donated over 200,000 dollars to end child hunger. Fees Vary. feastportland.com


blog 8 2016 6
Wine Country Half Marathon- August 13, 2016

Do you love to run? Do you love wine? If you said yes to at least one of these questions, the Wine Country Half Marathon is perfect for you. The course takes you in the heart of Willamette wine country. It starts at Stoller Family Estate and finishes on Main Street in Carlton where you are greeted by the Wine and Music Festival. At the Festival there will be over 20 local wineries and live music along with the Lagunitas Brewing Company! Come join the summer fun! Fees Vary. destinationraces.com

Bounty of Yamhill County – August 26-28th, 2016blog 8 2016 2

In 2015, Bounty of Yamhill County placed #2 in USA TODAY 10 Best Readers’ Choice Award for Best General Food Festival. Get your wine adventure buddy and go horseback riding as your mode of travel to three Dundee Hill Wineries. Enjoy a sunrise air balloon ride followed by a sparkling brunch, do yoga and experience a wine tasting breakfast buffet, kayak in Oregon’s Willamette Valley River followed by a picnic lunch and tasting at Hyland estates, or even take part in an Eola-Amity hills vineyard hike. This weekend is full of adventure and wine! Fees Vary. bountyofyamhillcounty.com

 

blog 8 2016 3¡Salud! – November 11-12th, 2016

November 11th offers a variety of Cuvée Tasting and a Big Board Auction. A rare opportunity to taste over 40 wineries in Oregon, and meet the winemakers themselves. Each estate has made a specialty Cuvée just for this event and offers a barrel tasting that you cannot experience anywhere else. Saturday Night is the 25th Annual Wine Auction Celebration and Gala. The silent and live auction make a great opportunity to find rare library wines, winemaker experiences, unique travel packages, and to celebrate Pinot Noir. November 11: $275  November 12th, Gala and Auction: $500.  Saludauction.org
Continue to experience the Willamette Valley wines and stop by Youngberg Hill’s tasting room and try award winning Pinot Noirs. It is also the perfect time to sit on the deck, enjoy harvest and to stay at Youngberg Hill Inn and enjoy the view! Find us at: https://www.youngberghill.com

 

blog action photo tasting room sing

Veraison in the Willamette Valley

Veraison blogGrapes turning color in the Willamette Valley means that veraison is upon us. Veraison is an exciting time for grape growers because it signals the beginning of the ripening stage. Pinot Noir grapes turn from green to a dark black-blue color. Pinot Gris grapes turn autumn colors like orange, red, and yellow. Pinot Blanc grapes turn a very light frosty green. This process typically takes about two weeks to complete and then serious ripening begins.

Although it is the easiest to recognize, skin color is not the only change to occur. The pulp of the berries change from a gelatin to a more liquid consistency.  With this change, the pulp also adheres less to the seeds. The flavors of the fruit begin, meaning that instead of just tasting like grapes, you can taste all the other flavors that will later be enjoyed in the wine. The seeds themselves will turn from green to brown, lending to more mature seed tannins. The tannins that will show up in the wine later also develop in the skins, softening as the grape matures. And yes, the fruit becomes sweeter, shifting away from the unripen tartness.

From the time of veraison forward, we hope for continued long, cool, dry, sunny weather through harvest. This will slow the ripening and allow all of the above transitions to evolve in concert.  The more balanced all these characteristics are in the fruit at harvest, the more balanced and of higher quality the finished wine will be. Hot weather during ripening pushes the fruit to ripen faster bring out more robust, fruit forward characteristics that typically throw the wine out of balance. Too cool of weather may also lead to an unbalanced wine via unripe fruit.

It’s this important stage of the grapes growing cycle that makes Pinot Noir in the Willamette Valley so special. We are blessed with the weather needed to provide wonderfully balanced fruit to produce the highest quality Pinot Noir.

blog action photo tasting room sing

10 Reasons Why the Willamette Valley Wine Industry is so Sustainable

PrintAs a Willamette Valley wine grape grower, we pride ourselves on being a very sustainable lot. Here are 10 reasons:

1. We are small family farms that we are protecting the land and vines for future generations.
2. Most of us are raising our children on and around the vineyards.
3. Many of us have been influenced by the sustainable farming practices in Burgundy.
4. We believe that sustainable farming practices make for a higher quality wine.
5. Many of us are organic farmers.
6. Some of us farm holistically (biodynamically).
7. Many of us dry farm (no irrigation).
8. Because we are small, we can manage the more challenging aspects of sustainable farming practices.
9. Healthy ground leads to healthy vines, which leads to healthy fruit that ultimately creates healthy wine.
10. The climate for the Willamette Valley is optimal for sustainable farming practices.

The Willamette Valley is blessed by great soils above 300 feet in elevation as a result of uplift from the ancient ocean floor. These hillside soils are perfect for growing wine grapes. In the Valley, we generally get about 40 inches of rain a year, mostly from November through May. During the growing season, we get little rain with a relative humidity around 30%. We also benefit greatly from our close proximity to the Pacific Ocean; providing air conditioning during the summer and warmth during the winter. These factors all combine to give us the conditions that enable us to be more sustainable.

Drink healthy, Drink Oregon wine!

pop_up

Top Three Wine Tours in the Willamette Valley

wine-tasting tourWhat are the top three ways to wine tour in Willamette Valley?  With the sheer number of fantastic Oregon wineries it is easy to become overwhelmed trying to decide where to visit, organizing and planning your route, and for safety reasons: who will be the designated driver. Fortunately, wine tours are a simple solution to what could be a complex adventure. Wine tours are a great way to see and experience The Oregon Wine Country easily without sacrificing time or energy on the logistics. All you need to do is sit back, relax, and focus on enjoying all that the Willamette Valley has to offer. The following are our favorite wine tour companies.

A vienyard Wine Tour

A Vineyard Wine Tour Led by Debra Kabarsky, A Vineyard Wine Tour designs a special tour just for you. Debra can create the perfect and most memorable day visiting up to four breathtaking, world class, Willamette Valley Wineries. With their Mercedes-Benz Sprinter van, A Vineyard Wine Tour will deliver you in style with first class door to door service and a fresh seasonal lunch. Enjoy the beauty and splendor of the Willamette Valley. Website: avineyardwinetour.com

Black Tie Tour

Black Tie Tours  Operated by Stefan Czarnicki, whose family moved to the valley in 1997 to drink wine, hunt mushrooms and open a restaurant (The Joel Palmer House – Dayton, OR). They’ve been showing off Oregon ever since. At Black Tie Tours, it’s Stefan’s passion to share the best that Oregon has to offer. Their vehicles are always clean. Their drivers are always courteous, knowledgeable and on-time. And they always strive to give the best experience that suits you. Oregon is the star – they are the lens. Take a peek!  Website: www.blacktietours.cominsider wine tour

 

Insider’s Wine Tours  Operated by John Swenson, Insider’s Wine Tours accommodates groups of all sizes for visits to small, boutique wineries and premier wineries, as well.  All tours utilize their executive cars for a private affair. Tours include, private winery visits with winemakers, complimentary dinner transportation, picnic lunches and water. Located in the heart of Oregon Wine Country, they have easy access to unique wineries!  Website: www.insiderswinetour.com

If you are curious about what vineyards to experience, visit Top 10 Vineyards in Oregon

 

blog action photo tasting room sing
By: Molly Goldberg

Becoming a Flow Hive Beekeeper at Youngberg Hill

IMG_0442Since vineyard grapevines are self-pollinating, you may question why we’ve recently begun beekeeping up here at Youngberg Hill.  Quite simply, bees play an essential role within our bio-dynamic farming practices.  Becoming a beekeeper initially seemed out of my comfort zone but as the time goes by I find myself learning and enjoying bees more and more.  Bees are one of the most studied creatures on the planet with a highly complex society, who are essential to the production of a majority of our fruits, nuts, and vegetables.  Without these pollinators our diet would consist primarily of grains and wine.

I first became intrigued in beekeeping years ago but didn’t have the time to devote to it.  More recently, I came across a Facebook post about the Flow Hive.  They made beekeeping look easier than the traditional method so I asked my girls if any of them would be interested in doing it with me.

I was met with pure enthusiasm from my youngest, Aspen who is nine. With an adventurous twinkle in both our eyes we began our bee journey as partners.  I quickly learned that just because the Flow Hive offered some time savings when harvesting the honey we still needed to learn a lot about how to take care of the bees.

Our first step to becoming beekeepers was to attend a beekeeping class put on by the Willamette Valley Beekeepers Association. They presented a basic level of information on how bees work together, communicate, propagate, and survive. I was both intrigued and a bit overwhelmed at the information we were learning.  One thing that did become evident is the need for bees in order to maintain a healthy environment.  In a way, I felt like beekeeping would be one way that Aspen and I could work together to help save the world.  To be honest, for me the altruistic part of this venture is second to the enjoyment I experience spending time with Aspen. As for Aspen, she plans on speaking and giving presentations about bees to guests at Youngberg Hill and at school.

What about Bee Stings?

In our 13 years no one has ever been stung by a honeybee at Youngberg Hill.  We have received a number of stings from the wasps that live in all area vineyards and farms.  Wasps, like honeybees are beneficial in pollinating plants, but they aren’t our friends. Wasps are natural enemies of honeybees, so to be successful beekeepers we now need to take wasp management to a higher level.  When honeybees sting you they die so they really do want to avoid it at all cost.  They really don’t want to sting you!

Wasps sting and continue to live. For the most part if you leave bees alone they won’t bother you. You can work around them in the garden without fear. All they want to do is collect nectar and pollen.

Honey Goals

Our goal is to have successful hives to produce both honey and honeycomb that we can use at the Inn and sell in our gift shop.  Aspen is the CEO of the project and along with learning about beekeeping, she will be learning how to manage a business including keeping records, buying supplies, marketing, managing the hives and of course sampling the product to make sure it is the highest quality.

We are excited about this new experience, and will be sure to update our progress and knowledge with you as we move forward with our bee journey.

IMG_0386

Aspen & Nicolette Bee Day!

5 ways to Celebrate Oregon Wine Month in the Willamette Valley

Oregon wine month 2016May is Oregon Wine Month in the Willamette Valley, and we couldn’t think of a better time to enjoy all that this area has to offer. The following are five ways to get out and explore the lesser visited parts of the Willamette Valley.

  1. 3rd Street in downtown McMinnville: This is a hub for a variety of activities. Wander the sidewalks exploring the many locally owned boutique shops lining the street, or enjoy one of the several top notch restaurants such as Bistro Maison, Nick’s, Thistle, and the Barberry. While also on 3rd Street, stop by the Elizabeth Chambers Cellar for a wine tasting.
  2. McMinnville AVA: This viticulture area is the place to enjoy exquisite wines that are distinguished for their depth, complexity, bold structure, and black fruit. Enjoy less crowded tasting rooms, unique views, beautiful structures, and friendly hospitality at these family owned wineries. You’ll be treated to all of these things at Youngberg Hill, Coeur de Terre, Yamhill Valley, Maysara, Coleman, and J Wrigley.
  3. Eola Hills AVA: Travel over to McMinnville’s neighboring wine growing area to taste the difference that a few miles can make. Spend a day visiting Brooks, Bethel Heights, and Cristom. Make a lunch stop in Amity at the Blue Goat for fresh, local fare before continuing your wine tasting adventures at Coelho Winery.
  4. Yamhill-Carlton: This town is where you’ll find many small wine producers making great quality wines that you wouldn’t be able to find elsewhere. Carlton is also home to several tasting rooms for wineries from other parts of Oregon pouring bigger red varietals.
  5. The Oregon Coast: Ok, this may not be technically part of the Willamette Valley, but it is only a short trip from the heart of the valley. Many people don’t know that McMinnville is only 45 to 50 minutes from the Pacific Ocean.  Not only are there great beaches and views in Pacific City, there are many great restaurants along Hwy 101 from Pacific City to Newport. Take a break from wine tasting and head to the beach, enjoy some fresh seafood, and Oregon wines.
Scroll to top